Rose-Colored Glasses

A few years ago, I found a pair of glasses.  They were very pretty, indeed.  They fit perfectly on my face and  I want to tell you why these glasses are so special.

Before I found them, my world was a different place.  Before I put them on, I couldn’t see that well.  What I could see, was dark, dreary and usually out of focus.  Sometimes, it was so difficult to see, I cried, which made it worse. I could barely see myself without the glasses. Worse still, when I looked out into the world, I could barely see anything at all. Much to my chagrin, there was little to laugh about or enjoy at that time. It seemed as though I was trapped in a cave.  Light filtered through porous rocks in bits and pieces.

Cave_Image

The world was filled with images that I couldn’t understand, explain or embrace.  My eyes strained to focus.  People seemed to be frustrated, angry, and hurt as if I wasn’t the only one who couldn’t focus.  I read of murder, war and uncountable tragedies around the world and even in my own back yard.  People were dissatisfied with politics and economics.  Even social media platforms reflected these bitter tastes in everyone’s mouths.  I felt I would soon fall victim to the same.

The images prevented me from seeing clearly.  Children were starving and dying everywhere.  Women were abandoning their babies. People were killing each other over the most ridiculous things.  I would rub my eyes and wonder what made people act so irrationally and irresponsibly.

My broken heart had trouble healing, not just for my circumstances, but also for the world.  I fought to find healing in a divine power.  I struggled to rise up against the horrible things going on around me.  People I thought I knew, were cruel at times. They perjured themselves with their own perceptions of right or wrong.

It was when I fell into utter despair that it happened.  One day, without notice, I found these glasses.  I put them on.  They were a good fit.  Suddenly, I could see clearly.  Through the horror and devastation, there was light.  In the light, I could focus.  I didn’t have to drown in a world of darkness and foreboding.

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Strangely, there were people who said mean things to me and tried to get me to remove my glasses.  They claimed I wasn’t focused at all.  They thought I was fooling myself. They insisted the world was truly a ghastly place and everyone had to take care of themselves.  They believed evil outweighed goodness. They were convinced I was wearing the wrong glasses.

I felt sad for them.  They were frozen in their beliefs, bitter in their circumstances and spoke out of fear.  I refused to believe what they believed.  I refused to be fooled into thinking the world was a dark, hopeless place, filled with ugliness and terror.  I began to search for brighter things with my new eyes.  I began to find places and people who also wore the same type of glasses.  Eventually, I began to feel better because I had always believed that where there is light, darkness cannot exist. I wanted to be in the light.  I wanted to be the light.  I learned how to see better with corrected vision.  I began to feel hope and confidence in myself again.

I learned some very valuable lessons.

Without hope, there is only despair.  Without confidence, there is only failure.  I began to structure my mind and eyes around positivity.  I found goodness in terrible situations, including my own.  In fact, I began practicing this new mindset with myself first.  It took a few years to find the right focus.  I failed and tried again, but I never took the glasses off.

Over the last year, I encountered daily challenges that dared me to take the glasses off.  I persisted and overcame difficult situations.  I began to see positive changes occurring in my circumstances.  New things began to appear that weren’t there before – mentally, spiritually, physically and emotionally.  I knew that I ‘d made the right decision.

It is okay to be practical and realistic.  It is not okay to dwell in darkness.  Charles R. Swindoll said, “Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it.”  In a world that seems discordant at times, it is important to find peace and harmony.  It is even more important to pass that peace and harmony on to others, so that they may share in the light.

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My message to you is this: If you should find a pair of rose-colored glasses, try them on.  They may be exactly what you’ve needed all along!  Step out of the darkness and into the light!!

 

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Can You Hear Me, Medicare?

This is not a random post. Please – allow me to explain.  As a citizen of the greatest country in the world, (My apologies to all non-Americans. I am sure you  feel the same way about your country, as well.) I have expectations and dreams, like everyone else, when retirement comes knocking on my door. Call me a dreamer, but isn’t Medicare supposed to be a good thing?  Aren’t we supposed to be able to rely on this system when we retire?  The good news is that we can – as long as we need surgery and medication. 

I took my mother to the ear doctor today.  He didn’t tell me anything I didn’t already know.  After a complete audiogram, the results indicated she had moderately severe hearing loss in both ears.  I knew this already!  Everyone in my family can testify to my mother’s hearing loss!   She needed to hear it directly from the doctor, though.  That’s how she is. Unless the doctor has spoken, it goes in one ear and out the other, so to speak.octogenarians

On behalf of the doctor, he treated my mom with genuine respect.  He was kind, courteous, funny, and made her feel at ease.  After all, she’s an octogenarian.  Not everyone makes it to 80 years old and still has their wits about them.  She does, however.  Sharp as a whip, that mother of mine!  She can work a smart phone better than anyone her age!   We like to kid her and tell her that all those years of games and puzzles have paid off in her twilight years.physician-examines-ear-of-male-patient

There’s probably some truth in that, isn’t there?  The brain needs exercise too, like every other muscle and organ in our body. But, I digress.  The doctor told my mother that there was no magic pill or surgery that could fix her problem, which caused me to start thinking about his statement.  More on that statement in a minute. The solution? A very expensive hearing aid.  Here’s the problem with that.physicians symbol

” Medicare doesn’t cover routine hearing exams, hearing aids, or exams for fitting hearing aids.” (http://www.medicare.gov/coverage/hearing-and-balance-exam-and-hearing-aids.html)  I was deeply discouraged when I discovered this information.
There was good news, however.  My mother has secondary coverage.  So I called her secondary provider and learned they would pay up to $1500 for the cost of one hearing aid.  I asked many questions to the young lady at the secondary insurance company.  At the end of the conversation, I was absolutely guaranteed a $1500 benefit from her secondary insurance company.  I became so excited, I promptly told my mother the good news.  She was elated and near tears at the thought of being able to hear at a normal range again.  She lowered her head and her voice became shaky when she said, “Oh good. I’ll be able to hear again.  That’s great news!  My mother is a very proud woman.  She doesn’t want a hearing aid!  She doesn’t want to burden anyone either.  She is a very strong-willed woman, who has been taking care of herself her whole life.  She didn’t want me to see those tears.  I understood completely, as the apple didn’t fall that far from the tree.  Needless to say, I was excited for both of us.
The doctor’s visit had estimated that the cost of the hearing aid would be approximately $1500.   It seemed the cost of the hearing aid would be covered and my mom would soon be enjoying the necessity of a good ear once again.dollar signs smiley face
Then, I called the doctor.  My phone call was routed to the audiologist, instead.  Her telephone voice was calm, kind, and firm.  I gave her the good news.  Then,   she gave me the bad news.   She told me that my mother would have to pay for the hearing aid up front.  My heart sank.  I became very upset.  I kept my emotions to myself temporarily.  I asked the audiologist why my mother should pay for it first if the insurance company is going to pay for it. She explained that the doctor’s office pays for the devices in bulk, or “large invoices,” as she put it.   She said that their experience has been that insurance companies frequently offer to pay “up to $1500” for hearing aids.  She said that whenever they say “up to,” it usually means they are only going to pay for a small portion of the cost. Age I reassured her that I asked the insurance company several questions, including “exactly” how much they would pay for a simple device.  She continued to say that they usually pay 1/3 of the cost and because the doctor’s office doesn’t bill balances to the patient, they have lost a lot of money.
At this point, my emotions ranged from disappointment to anger. disappointment I’m not exactly sure who I am angry with – the doctor or the insurance company.  Maybe I feel angry at both of them. I am thinking about my mother now, as the audiologist apologizes for company policy.  I don’t want to be harsh, as she does not make the company policy, but at the same time, an apology is not going to get my mother a hearing aid.  She doesn’t have $1500 to give to the doctor up front.  That’s why she paid for insurance her whole life.  Why should she suffer because a) the doctor’s office buys the devices in bulk,  b) some insurance companies don’t deliver, and c) some people don’t pay their bills.  I don’t understand the office policy.  I understand finances and overhead.  I even understand corporate economics.  I worked on Wall Street for 12 years.  I get it.  What I don’t get is why an otolaryngologist expects an 80-year-old woman to pay for her simple hearing device up front.  This hearing device is at the bottom of the device pool.  It’s not even the expensive one that comes with all the bells and whistles.  anger_quote
My mother raised eight children, almost by her herself.  She was raised in an orphanage and began working when she was 17 years old.  She has paid into Medicare for 58 years.  Let’s say she only paid $25 a week into the retirement coverage.  It’s way more than that, I can say, but let’s just be hypothetical and kind for the sake of argument.  She has always had a job.  Therefore, that would be a grand sum of $75,400 paid into Medicare in her lifetime.  We all know this is a ridiculously conservative figure.  Most of us pay twice that, if not more.  You would think that at the ripe old age of 80, Medicare could afford to buy her a hearing aid.  Even though her secondary coverage has offered to pay for it, the doctor will only supply a hearing aid if she pays for it beforehand.
What’s wrong with this picture?  Anyone?
After some research, I quickly learned that hearing aids are not the only necessities Medicare doesn’t cover.   Look at the following list that Medicare does not cover.  Examine it closely!

“Some of the items and services that Medicare doesn’t cover include:

    • Long-term care (also called custodial care)
    • Most dental care
    • Eye examinations related to prescribing glasses
    • Dentures
    • Cosmetic surgery
    • Acupuncture
    • Hearing aids and exams for fitting them
    • Routine foot care”

(http://www.medicare.gov/what-medicare-covers/not-covered/item-and-services-not-covered-by-part-a-and-b.html)

As the site states, these are SOME of the items Medicare doesn’t cover.  I can see that my mother, who wears dentures, will not be covered for the cost of a new set of dentures.  Her dentures are in desperate need of repair.  Being able to get proper nourishment is not a luxury.  It is a necessity.  Being able to hear is a not a luxury.  It is a necessity.dentures
My mother is also a diabetic, so proper foot care is also a necessity, not a luxury.    According to the National Diabetes Education Program, “10.9 million Americans ages 65 and older have diabetes..”  That’s a lot of people who need proper foot care.  It’s not covered under Medicare.  I’m not done yet, either.foot care
Medicare does not cover eyeglasses.  Here’s what the website says: “Generally, Medicare doesn’t cover eyeglasses or contact lenses. However, following cataract surgery that implants an intraocular lensMedicare Part B (Medical Insurance) helps pay for corrective lenses (one pair of eyeglasses or one set of contact lenses).”http://www.medicare.gov/coverage/eyeglasses-contact-lenses.html”
My mother had an intraocular lens implant.  I am getting suspicious at this point.rolling eyesg  
Overall, Medicare doesn’t cover hearing aids, dentures, foot care, or eyeglasses. These are not luxuries.  These are necessities for many who will make it to 80 years of age.  You need to be able to see, hear, and eat to survive, but these basic services are not covered under the healthcare system that has at least $75,400 of my mother’s money.  I fail to see the point in paying in to this system if these services will not be available at my time of retirement, either!
The following is my opinion, but I strongly suggest you do your own research and get the facts yourself.  Consider this – hearing aids do not require surgery.  Eyeglasses do not require surgery.  Foot care does not require surgery.  Dentures do not require surgery.  That is not to say that ear surgery, eye surgery, foot surgery and dental surgery will not occur.  However, If you don’t need ear surgery, but still need a hearing-aid, you are not covered under the Medicare program. If you don’t qualify for an intraocular lens implant, forget about those eyeglasses, unless you are prepared to pay for them yourself!  By the way, they can become quite expensive.  Apply the same line of thinking to foot care and dentures. Do you see a pattern here?heart puzzle
It is my opinion that unless you need to take a pill or need to have surgery, you will have to fend for yourself at 75 years of age.  Unless insurance companies and some doctor’s offices are getting paid by you and the rest of these United States, you will be held responsible for your own eye care, dental care, hearing care, and foot care.  All of these types of healthcare can become very expensive.    
What does any of this have to do with the title of my blog, you ask?  My dream is that all people are created equal, regardless of race, creed, gender, or age.  My dream is that healthcare is offered to all people, regardless of race, creed, gender, or age.  I don’t mean affordable healthcare, either.  I mean free healthcare. After paying into the very same healthcare system for 57 years of one’s life, if they worked every day from age 18 until age 75, Medicare should be utilizing a person’s hard-earned money to provide them with basic needs. greedy hands  Where did that money go?  Why are insurance companies quick to pay for surgeries and medications, but decline to pay for the very basic necessities of life?  
As a beloved rock group of mine says, “Think for yourself.  Question authority” (Tool).  When you stop asking questions, you allow systems to become unchecked and therefore, fail.  Medicare has failed.
Fortunately, my mother is living in North Carolina.  There is a state program that will evaluate her need and provide her with a free hearing-aid, if she qualifies.  Thank you, North Carolina, for caring for the elderly.  I pray she qualifies, because I am going deaf with her.  
Thank you for allowing me to rant and rave about healthcare.  Thank you for reading this post.  All comments are welcome, as always.  I am done now.  Blog on!  praying_hands[1]